Asterisk, and other worldly endeavours.

A blog by Leif Madsen

Posts Tagged ‘cloud

CentOS 5.8 On AWS EC2 With Xen Kernel (PVGRUB)

At CoreDial we’ve been using a lot of AWS EC2 lately for building sandbox infrastructure for testing. Part of the infrastructure is a voice platform utilizing Asterisk 1.4 and 1.8, and those voice platforms are using Zaptel and DAHDI respectively for use with MeetMe(). This hasn’t been an issue previously as our testing has either been on bare metal, or in other virtual machine systems where installation of a base image and standard kernel are not an issue.

However, with the introduction of a lot of EC2 instances in our testing process, we ran into issues with building our own DAHDI RPMs since there aren’t any EC2 kernel development packages outside of OpenSuSE (which we don’t use). After spending a day of trying to hack around it, Kevin found a PDF from Amazon that states AWS now supports the ability to load your own kernels via PVGRUB. Great! If I can do that, then I can just continue using the same RPMs I’d be building anyways (albeit the xen based kernel, but that’s easy to do in the spec file).

Unfortunately this was not nearly as trivial and simple as it appeared at first. The first problem was that I had to figure out the correct magic kernel AKI that needed to be loaded, and the PDF wasn’t incredibly clear about which one to use. (There is two different styles of the AKI, one called “hd0” and another called “hd00” which I’ll get into shortly.) After searching Google and looking through several forum posts and other blogs (linked at the end), I finally found a combination that seems to work for our imported CentOS 5.8 base image. Below is a list of the steps I executed after loading up an image from our base AMI:

  • yum install grub kernel-xen kernel-xen-devel
  • grub-install /dev/sda
  • cd /boot/
  • mkinitrd -f -v –allow-missing –builtin uhci-hcd –builtin ohci-hcd –builtin ehci-hcd –preload xennet –preload xenblk –preload dm-mod –preload linear –force-lvm-probe /boot/initrd-2.6.18-308.13.1.el5xen.img 2.6.18-308.13.1.el5xen
  • touch /boot/grub/menu.lst
  • cat /boot/grub/menu.lst
default 0
timeout 1

title EC2
     root (hd0)
     kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.18-308.11.1.el5xen root=/dev/sda1
     initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.18-308.11.1.el5xen.img

Once the changes were made to the image, I took a snapshot of the running instances volume. I then created an image from the snapshot. When creating the image, I selected a new kernel ID. The kernel ID’s for the various zones and architectures are listed in the PDF. As our base image was CentOS 5.8 i386 in the us-east-1 zone, I had to select between either aki‐4c7d9525 or aki‐407d9529. The paragraph above seems to indicate there is a difference based on what type of machine you’re using, and references S3 or EBS based images. We are using EBS based images, so I tried the first one, which in the end failed miserably. After reading through the IonCannon blog post it became clear that the hd0 and hd00 AKIs are really differences in whether you have a single partition, or multiple partitions with a separate /boot/ partition.

With that bit of knowledge, and knowing that we only had a single partition that contained our /boot/ directory, I knew to use aki-407d9529 (hd0). Another forum post also pointed out that I needed to enable some modules for the xen kernel or the system wouldn’t boot (and I verified that by stepping through each of the steps listed above to make sure it was required). With those two major items checked off, I am now able to build an AMI that will load with a stock CentOS Xen kernel image, making it trivial to build RPMs against now.

Note: If you do happen to use separate partitions, make sure you use the hd00 AKI. In the menu.lst you need to make sure to use root (hd0,0) instead of just (hd0). Additionally, your menu.lst file needs to live at /boot/boot/grub/menu.lst since AWS is going to look in the /boot/grub/menu.lst location on the /boot/ partition. On a single partition the file can just live at /boot/grub/menu.lst.

References

Written by Leif Madsen

2012/08/22 at 9:10 am

Now working with CoreDial

As of January 3rd, I’m now working with the CoreDial team full time. I’ve worked with them as a consultant on their infrastructure over the last few years but now will be spending significantly more time working with the engineering team 🙂

From the announcement,

CoreDial is pleased to announce the addition of Leif Madsen to the CoreDial team,” said Alan Rihm, CEO at CoreDial. “Leif is a well known Asterisk consultant who specializes in distributed telephony deployments and database integration. In addition, Leif is co-author of several O’Reilly published books on Asterisk, including Asterisk: The Definitive Guide (3rd edition). We’re pleased to be adding Leif to our team, and look forward to the exciting opportunity to work together.

The entire announcement can be found at http://coredial.com/asterisk-consultant-leif-madsen-joins-coredial-team/

I’m really excited to be working with these guys, and to see what we’ll develop over the coming months! I’ll keep you informed here on my blog, and will continue to post Asterisk tidbits and snippets as I go.

Written by Leif Madsen

2012/01/04 at 3:22 pm

MindMeister: Online mind mapping

Russell Bryant just sent me a link to a neat site that allows you to do online collaborative mind mapping: MindMeister. If you’re not aware of what mind mapping software does, it is a method to quickly and easily allow you to brainstorm ideas without getting in the way too much. It works by starting from a central node and breaking out in lines from there where you start with an idea or thought, then break that thought down further with additional lines from that node.

While working on the next edition of the Asterisk book, we spent a significant amount of time using FreeMind to brainstorm ideas of what we wanted in the book, then develop a detailed outline to the book which included the chapters, and what each of those chapters would contain. This way we can reference the mindmap while working on the book, and later review all our thoughts to make sure we covered all our original ideas. We continue to refine the mindmap on an almost daily basis while we come up with additional ideas and layout tweaks while working on particular chapters.

The website allows you to import mindmaps from FreeMind into the site, which is a valuable tool for those who have existing mindmaps. Check it out and tell me what you think!

Written by Leif Madsen

2010/08/10 at 9:03 am

AstriCon 2009 Presentation — Building a Distributed Call Center

For those who missed it, you’re able to get a PDF of my AstriCon 2009 presentation from the http://www.astricon.net website.

http://images.tmcnet.com/expo/astricon/presentations/cc01-madsen-digium.pdf

There are additional presentations available from the conference as well. Check them out here:  http://www.astricon.net/2009/astricon/agendaAtaGlance.aspx

Overall, the conference was extremely well attended and I had a great time. I’ve been to a lot of conferences, and AstriCon is definitely a premiere conference that is professionally run, and contains a great deal of useful information by well versed presenters with little fluff (i.e. sales pitches). I met a bunch of great people there who are quite intelligent, and hope to keep in contact with them.

If you’re looking for conferences to budget for next year, definitely keep AstriCon on your short list.

Written by Leif Madsen

2009/11/18 at 3:40 pm